ISSN No. 1606-7754                   Vol.14 No.3  December 2006

Relationship between random blood sugar and body mass index in an African population
Adamu G Bakari1, Geoffrey C Onyemelukwe1, Bala G Sani1, Ibrahim S Aliyu2, Sani S Hassan3 and Tambaya M Aliyu3
Departments of Medicine1, Chemical Pathology,2 & Community Medicine3, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital Zaria, Nigeria

Abstract

Background: Obesity is the most important modifiable risk factor in the pathogenesis of type-2 diabetes reported in most cross-sectional studies. However, racial factors seem to be important in the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and glucose intolerance. Methods: Three-hundred and seventeen subjects participated in the study. Mean age of subjects was 35.0+9.8 years (33.0+9.6 among females and 36.2+9.6 among males p= 0.1007). Results: Female subjects had significantly higher BMI than their male counterparts, (26.6+7.2 kg/m2 versus 24.0+5.4 kg/m2 p=0.0341). Random blood sugar levels were, however, similar between males and females (85.2+27.0 mg/dl versus 85.9+14.7 mg/dl, p=0.8868). There was a positive but non significant correlation between casual blood sugar and BMI among female subjects (r= +0.1520, p>0.05). In the males however, there was no correlation between these variables (r= -0.0395, p>0.5). Conclusion: BMI is higher among females in this community and correlates with random blood glucose levels. Concerted efforts need to be made to address the issue of weight in this community within the framework of what is culturally acceptable. (Int J Diabetes Metab 14:144-145, 2006)

Keywords: BMI, Casual Blood Glucose, obesity

Introduction

Obesity is the most important modifiable risk factor in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes reported in most cross-sectional studies.1,2 A positive correlation is therefore assumed to exist between random blood glucose and obesity. However, racial factors seem to be important in the relationship between body mass index (an index of adiposity) and glucose intolerance even though large studies such as the Scottish study did not demonstrate a correlation between casual blood sugar and BMI.3 There are no previous studies in this region that sought to define the relationships between these variables. This study was therefore undertaken to determine whether BMI and casual blood sugar are related.

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