ISSN No. 1606-7754                   Vol.17 No.1 April 2009

Oxidative stress in first degree relatives of type 2 diabetic patients
Syed Ibrahim Rizvi and Neeti Srivastava
Department of Biochemistry, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002, India

Abstract

Epidemiological studies on twins and families have provided a strong correlation for genetic factors contributing to etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).  Diabetes mellitus is strongly associated with oxidative stress, which can be a consequence of either increased production of free radicals, reduced antioxidant defense or both.  The present work was undertaken to study known markers of erythrocyte oxidative stress: malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) in first degree relatives of T2DM patients, and plasma antioxidant status in an effort to understand the role of oxidative stress in the etiology of type 2 diabetes. Our results show that the antioxidant potential of the plasma is 14% lower in first degree relatives, the intracellular GSH is lower by 9% and lipid peroxidation measured in terms of MDA is elevated by 20%, compared to normal controls. These findings show that an impaired redox balance may be a cause for disturbance of homeostasis in type 2 diabetic families even before the development of the disease. We hypothesize that that oxidative stress precedes the development of overt diabetic state.

Keywords: Type 2 diabetes mellitus, families, erythrocyte, oxidative stress

Introduction

The past two decades have seen an explosive increase in the number of people diagnosed with diabetes worldwide. Epidemiological studies on twins and families have provided a strong correlation for genetic factors contributing to etiology of type 2 diabetes.1 A strong familial aggregation has been observed among Asian Indians with high prevalence among first-degree relatives and vertical transmission through two or more generations.2 Diabetes mellitus is strongly associated with oxidative stress, which can be a consequence of either increased production of free radicals, reduced antioxidant defense or both.3 Despite large number of studies it is not clear whether oxidative stress is a factor contributing to the development of diabetic condition or it is a consequence of the disease. Erythrocyte oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.4 The present work was undertaken to study known markers of erythrocyte oxidative stress: malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) in first degree relatives of T2DM patients, in an effort to understand the role of oxidative stress in the etiology of type 2 diabetes.

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